Monthly Newspaper • DIOCESE OF BRIDGEPORT

Register for CONVIVIO 2019 this weekend!

BRIDGEPORT—Every year in the Diocese of Bridgeport, over two hundred high school students take part in CONVIVIO, an international conference for the youth, run by youth. CONVIVIO encourages students to grow in their relationship with the Lord by asking hard questions in order to find real answers, and then challenges them to go back to their families, parishes and schools to share their newfound or affirmed belief. It also reminds students that they are part of something greater, that they are not alone in the Christian life and that there are concrete ways to implement change in their world.

The weekend is centered around the Eucharist and includes Mass, Adoration, and the opportunity to go to the Sacrament of Reconciliation. In addition to participation in the Sacraments, nationally known speakers will be giving the keynote addresses. There will also be small group discussion, games and time for fellowship. Every year, CONVIVIO is led by local high school and college students and is open to any high school student, no matter where they are in their faith. This year, CONVIVIO will take place on March 1, 2, and 3, 2019, at Sacred Heart University in Fairfield and the theme is “To Whom Shall We Go?” The planning committee, comprised entirely of former CONVIVIO participants, has put together a weekend rooted in Truth that aims to answer to this question that is especially relevant in the lives of our teens.

Registration is now open at www.convivio‐us.org!

(For more information visit: connecticut@convivio.org.)

‘Face to Face’ Formation Workshops Begin

BRIDGEPORT—The Leadership Institute of the Diocese of Bridgeport has announced a series of  45 “Face-to-Face Formation” workshops, which will be held throughout the diocese in the coming months for all lay liturgical ministers readers, musicians, and Extraordinary Ministers of Holy Communion as part of the introduction of new Norms Governing the Liturgical Ministries.

More than 4,000 men and women liturgical ministers are expected to attend the formation sessions in parishes throughout the diocese from January through May 20, 2019. All parish face-to-face sessions are two hours and include local, practical formation. Each gathering will also include 30 minutes of registration tech-support before and after each meeting.

More than 50 people attended the first meeting held last night at St. John Parish in Darien.  The program began with a video message from Bishop Frank J. Caggiano. Participants also received Formation Workshop booklets.

The Norms Governing the Liturgical Ministries for the Diocese of Bridgeport went into effect on January 1, 2019, as a response to the fourth diocesan synod and its call for reform and renewal. After one year ad experimentum, the norms will be revised and become permanent.

The norms offer standards and required formation for those who serve as Readers (proclaimers of the Word at Mass), Extraordinary Ministers of Holy Communion (EMHC), Altar Servers, and musicians.

“By definition, norms are an authoritative standard. Liturgical norms regulate how the public worship of the Church is to be carried out. In the case of the Holy Eucharist, these norms ensure that the celebration of Mass in our diocese is in conformity with the universal liturgical law of the Church,” said Patrick Donovan, executive director of the Leadership Institute, which is sponsoring the workshops and online formation.

Donovan said the norms of the Diocese of Bridgeport are based on the teaching and guidance of Sacred Scripture, Sacred Tradition, the Magisterium and the entire prayer history of the Church, the Bride of Christ.

More than two dozen clergy, lay leaders, and theologians worked to develop these norms over the course of a year, he said.

Readers, musicians, and Extraordinary Ministers of Holy Communion who are grandfathered into the formation have been invited to complete an online module and attend a face-to-face gathering, which can be hosted at their parish. Most have already received an invitation to register online through their participation in the Virtus database.

Most of the formation for Altar Servers will happen at the parish level. Musicians are invited to watch one module online and then attend a face-to-face conversation with Bishop Caggiano on February 16, 2019. Donovan said that while the February 16  event is geared towards musicians, those who serve in this role may attend any workshop for credit.

Donovan added that anyone who currently serves in any of these liturgical roles who has not received an invitation via email should confirm that their Virtus status is up to date and then contact institute@diobpt.org to request an invitation. Everyone will be required to register with The Leadership Institute and participate in formation opportunities around the diocese. Paper applications are available for those without computer access.

When liturgical ministers have met all requirements, they will receive your certificate (“the mandate”), which should be presented to the pastor. Pastors will also receive a list of those to whom a mandate has been given by the bishop.

The dates for Formation Gatherings are as follows:

Introducing the Institute’s new learning portal: LEAD. It’s all about Leadership, Evangelization, Accompaniment, and Discipleship and it invites users into a new online learning platform that will inspire your ministry and help shape your catechesis.

Entry for those who will be grandfathered into liturgical ministries will receive an email. Those currently serving as a liturgical minister who did not receive in online invitation should confirm their Virtus status and then email institute@diobpt.org.

Anyone new to ministry who would like to serve as a reader, Extraordinary Minister of Holy Communion, or musician, can also visit the Leadership Institute website—formationreimagined.org—after February 1 when formation for new ministers opens.

Diaconate Discovery Evenings Continue

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NORWALK- Have you ever wondered if you were being “called” to discern the diaconate?  Has someone, your pastor, a priest or a deacon ever mentioned to you that they can see you as a deacon someday? Do you feel that God calling you to live your faith differently, perhaps as a deacon?  Want to learn more about how to sort this all out? Join us for a Diaconate Discovery Evening on January 10, 2019 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm at St. Philip Parish, Norwalk.

Join Deacon Tim Bolton and explore some of these questions and others that you may have about the Diaconate.  Diaconate Discovery Evenings are a consistent space to wonder, explore, pray and share with other men of faith regarding serving the Church as a Permanent Deacon.

  • Be with other men of faith who are wondering if God is calling them to serve as a deacon.
  • To have an opportunity for prayer and reflection.
  • To form relationships and build community.
  • Meet deacons from around the diocese witnessing their ministries and journeys of faith.

If you are interested in attending or have any questions, please feel free to contact Deacon Tim Bolton, Coordinator of Diaconate Vocations, dnbolton@diobpt.org.

Youth Choir Prepares for Christmas Concert

BRIDGEPORT—It seems few things inspire the Christmas spirit more than the joyful music of the season, especially when it is performed by young people eager to share their faith through song. One such special group is the Diocesan Youth Choir (C4Y) which is preparing for their fourth annual “Arise and Shine” concert at the Klein Memorial Auditorium in Bridgeport on Friday, December 21. With over 135 singers from children in grade six through seniors in college, this is a musical journey in which the students and their director showcase a passion for song and a devotion to God.

“This is so exciting for them!” said Mary Bozzuti-Higgins, a professional performer and opera singer who has directed C4Y since its inception in 2014. “This is a special night—a feast for the eyes, ears, heart and soul.”

With a seven-piece ensemble, including piano, oboe, flute, trumpet, violin, trombone and percussion, the program will include traditional carols and contemporary favorites. Beginning with the customary first piece “Arise and Shine,” Bozzuti-Higgins has also chosen singer favorites like “Mary, Did You Know?”, a modern Christmas classic, and “Believe,” a selection from the popular movie The Polar Express.

The students also plan to combine with three children’s choirs from local parishes—St. Theresa in Trumbull, Our Lady of Fatima in Wilton, and St. Matthew in Norwalk—to perform “Christ Child Noel.” Additionally, concert-goers will be treated to the eight-movement musical journey “Were You There on That Christmas Night?” with four C4Y narrators and two college soloists accompanying the ensemble.

A highly anticipated number is always the final selection “Dark Is the Silent Night,” performed against a backdrop set to resemble a snow topped pine forest. As the lights descend and the piece concludes, choir members hold small candles, enhancing the mood of the dark and silent night.

“The pieces we choose are music they love,” the director said. “And I want them to feel that connection—and have a passion for music throughout their lives.”

In addition to the regular choir, dozens of former C4Y members will be returning from college to participate, sharing that their devotion to their faith does not end when they graduate.

“We have 40 alumni performing,” said Bozzuti-Higgins, who holds the Dress Rehearsal with dinner, cookie swap, and gift exchange for the entire choir the evening before the concert. “It’s so much fun for them that they keep coming back!”

It is that true sense of joy exuded through the music and comradery that keeps students involved. During a recent rehearsal, Evan Bean, a senior from Fairfield Prep, said, “At C4Y we really have fun. I love being in a community of like-minded Catholic youth.”

Singer Sophie Chorek, a junior at St. Joseph High School, considers her involvement with C4Y to be a stress reliever, saying, “This is just another way to express my faith in addition to school and church. And I just love to sing!”

Such reactions from the young people involved validate the original purpose of C4Y, which grew from the 2014 Synod. “This was the brainchild of Bishop Caggiano,” said Bozzuti-Higgins. “He is so passionate about young people and wants to keep them growing on their faith journey. We are so lucky to have him as the Shepherd of our diocese! We also have an amazing of array of dedicated and talented young people.”

This dedication begins long before the Christmas season, as students start practicing in July and attend one of six weekly rehearsals Bozzuti-Higgins holds at various locations throughout the diocese during the school year. At a recent rehearsal at the Catholic Center in Bridgeport, students were consistently encouraged by their director who called out “Gentlemen – good job! Ladies, together now!”

When she then suggested the group review The Polar Express selection, one 6th grader whispered to his friend, “Ooo, I love ‘Believe’!”

With their feet keeping time with the music and their hands holding folders emblazoned with “C4Y,” sopranos, altos, tenors and bass joined voices in the memorable refrain, singing, “We find ourselves again on Christmas Day…”

In sharing a devotion to their faith through a passion for their music, the youth of C4Y will surely bring joy to all those who believe in the glory of this season.

 

You may purchase a ticket for this year’s Arise and Shine Concert online.
To learn more about C4Y, please visit the Choir’s webpage.

Diaconate Discovery Evening This Thursday

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TRUMBULL- Have you ever wondered if you were being “called” to discern the diaconate?  Has someone, your pastor, a priest or a deacon ever mentioned to you that they can see you as a deacon someday? Do you feel that God calling you to live your faith differently, perhaps as a deacon?  Want to learn more about how to sort this all out? Join us for a Diaconate Discovery Evening this Thursday, 7pm – 8:30pm at St. Stephens Parish.

Join Deacon Tim Bolton and explore some of these questions and others that you may have about the Diaconate.  Diaconate Discovery Evenings are a consistent space to wonder, explore, pray and share with other men of faith regarding serving the Church as a Permanent Deacon.

  • Be with other men of faith who are wondering if God is calling them to serve as a deacon.
  • To have an opportunity for prayer and reflection.
  • To form relationships and build community.
  • Meet deacons from around the diocese witnessing their ministries and journeys of faith.

If you are interested in attending or have any questions, please feel free to contact Deacon Tim Bolton, Coordinator of Diaconate Vocations, dnbolton@diobpt.org.

The Extraordinary Minister of Holy Communion

Each week, beginning in mid-October and continuing until the first Sunday of Advent, The Leadership Institute has published a series of articles that have been distributed at all parishes in the Diocese of Bridgeport as we await Bishop Caggiano’s promulgation of the Revised Liturgical Norms.

An intro to each article and the links to each in English and Spanish can be found below. The article below marks our final Catechesis piece on the Revised Liturgical Norms. Click here to learn more about the Norms.

The Eucharistic celebration is the source and summit of our faith. We are called to become what we receive and that should change everything: how we act, how we speak to one another, and how we live our lives. This week, read about those faithful individuals who assist the ordinary minister of the Eucharist in extraordinary ways.

The Extraordinary Minister of Holy Communion
For Catholics, the Eucharist is the most important sacrament and the center of faith itself.

The Catechism of the Catholic Church calls the Eucharist “the source and summit of Christian life” (1324) and “the sum and summary of our faith” (1327). All other works of the Church spring from it:

“The other sacraments, and indeed all ecclesiastical ministries and works of the apostolate, are bound up with the Eucharist and are oriented toward it. For in the blessed Eucharist is contained the whole spiritual good of the Church, namely Christ himself” (CCC, 1324).

Continue reading our fifth Catechesis Article here.

The Role of the Reader at Mass

Each week, beginning in mid-October and continuing until the first Sunday of Advent, The Leadership Institute will publish a series of articles that will be distributed at all parishes in the Diocese of Bridgeport as we await Bishop Caggiano’s promulgation of the Revised Liturgical Norms. 

An intro to each article and the links to each in English and Spanish can be found below. A new article will be added each week. Click here to learn more about the Norms.

Nothing can be more distracting than a reader who proclaims Sacred Scripture as though he or she is seeing the words for the very first time. A well-formed reader is essential to an engaging Eucharistic experience. This week, read more about the role of the reader at Mass, including how Jesus is a role model for today’s readers.

The Role of the Reader at Mass
The one who serves as a reader in Sacred Liturgy is the person designated to proclaim Sacred Scripture (with the exception of the Gospel). This person would also proclaim the psalm response (in the absence of a cantor), and the Universal Prayer or, as it is commonly known, the Prayer of the Faithful (in the absence of a deacon). Though this person is often called a “lector,” a quick study of the General Instruction of the Roman Missal (GIRM) indicates that this is a misnomer. The lector is actually an instituted office of the Church, much like an Acolyte. So what is a reader?

“In the absence of an instituted lector, other lay people may be deputed (i.e., delegated) to proclaim the readings from Sacred Scripture, people who are truly suited to carrying out this function and carefully prepared, so that by their hearing the readings from the sacred texts the faithful may conceive in their hearts a sweet and living affection for Sacred Scripture” (GIRM, 101). For the purpose of the Revised Liturgical Norms in the Diocese of Bridgeport, the term “reader” will be used as it most closely reflects the General Instruction. As a formal ministry, the ministry of lector is meant to be conferred on men who are preparing to become deacons and priests and it received as part of their preparation for ordination.

Continue reading our fifth Catechesis Article here.

The Role of Altar Servers in Liturgy

Each week, beginning in mid-October and continuing until the first Sunday of Advent, The Leadership Institute will publish a series of articles that will be distributed at all parishes in the Diocese of Bridgeport as we await Bishop Caggiano’s promulgation of the Revised Liturgical Norms. 

An intro to each article and the links to each in English and Spanish can be found below. A new article will be added each week. Click here to learn more about the Norms.

The young men and women who answer the call to serve at the altar as servers fulfill and important duty. They are called to help the celebrant, to set the table, and assist as he receives the gifts of the community. They do all these things as invisibly as they can so as to not distract from the solemnity of Mass. This week, read more about the history of Altar Servers and the important ministry they provide.

The Role of Altar Servers in Liturgy

The server is both a member of the assembly and a minister in the sanctuary. With a foot in both worlds, the server has an unusual perspective when participating at Mass. He or she is called to fully and actively participate in the liturgy, and yet is also called to serve in a particular way.

At the last supper, someone had to set the table and prepare the meal. The servers are not mentioned, but unquestionably the very first Eucharist would have relied on servers. When the early Church gathered together for the breaking of bread in homes, someone had to perform the same functions. In time the liturgy became more stylized, and so did its ministers.

Continue reading our fourth Catechesis Article here.

Music in the Sacred Liturgy

Each week, beginning in mid-October and continuing until the first Sunday of Advent, The Leadership Institute will publish a series of articles that will be distributed at all parishes in the Diocese of Bridgeport as we await Bishop Caggiano’s promulgation of the Revised Liturgical Norms. 

An intro to each article and the links to each in English and Spanish can be found below. A new article will be added each week. Click here to learn more about the Norms.

Have you ever been to Mass and been so moved by the music you look at the author’s name? You are so overwhelmed by the words, you have to know who penned such beauty? Music can be a powerful part of our liturgical experience. This week, read more about the power of music in Sacred Liturgy as we prepare for the promulgation of the Revised Liturgical Norms this Advent.

Music in the Sacred Liturgy

I will sing to the Lord as long as I live; I will sing praise to my God while I have being. Psalm 104:33

Music is a gift from God, and the capacity to make music dwells within each human person. Music is also – simultaneously – an individual and communal activity. It is music’s communal nature that makes it an ideal art form for use in Divine Worship. The primary animator of this art form in the liturgy is the assembly. At certain times the priest, the deacon, the choir, the musicians, the psalmist, and the cantor have specific roles of their own, but it is the assembly that participates in every moment of the liturgical celebration.

Continue reading our third Catechesis Article here.

The Role of the Laity in Liturgy

Each week, beginning last Sunday and continuing until the first Sunday of Advent, The Leadership Institute will publish a series of articles that will be distributed at all parishes in the Diocese of Bridgeport as we await Bishop Caggiano’s promulgation of the Revised Liturgical Norms. 

An intro to each article and the links to each in English and Spanish can be found below. A new article will be added each week. Click here to learn more about the Norms.

Today, more than ever, the role of the laity in Sacred Liturgy and in the Church in general, is important for Catholics to understand. The second catechetical article, “The Role of the Laity,” discusses how laypeople are called to share in the mission of Christ’s Church by living in the midst of the world and addressing all its problems and concerns with the divine message of salvation.

The Role of the Laity in Liturgy

Never before in the history of the Church has the absolutely essential role of the layperson been so dramatically emphasized as it is now. Particularly since Vatican II, the Church has called for a renewal in the life and role of the laity. Yet among the faithful, there remains a fundamental lack of understanding of the lay vocation and its role in the Church’s mission.

For many, there is a notion that the only real vocation in the Church is the ordained or vowed priesthood and religious. They believe “the Church” is the ordained office and only people in habits or collars are called to serve. Many think that the role of the laity is to help out around the parish and that they are not called to play an integral part in the mission of the Church.

Continue reading our second Catechesis Article here.

What is the Sacred Liturgy?

Each week, beginning this Sunday and continuing until the first Sunday of Advent, The Leadership Institute will publish a series of articles that will be distributed at all parishes in the Diocese of Bridgeport as we await Bishop Caggiano’s promulgation of the Revised Liturgical Norms. 

An intro to each article and the links to each in English and Spanish can be found below. A new article will be added each week. Click here to learn more about the Norms.

Week One: What is the Sacred Liturgy?

Until the documents of the Second Vatican Council were published, Sacred Liturgy was shrouded in mystery. The first catechetical article, “What is Sacred Liturgy?” asserts that today, we have a better balance in understanding the aspects of the Liturgy and an even greater grasp of what the Church believes and teaches about the Sacred Liturgy will bring forth much fruit for the life of the Church.

After the Second Vatican Council (1962- 1965), when the word liturgy sprang into more common usage, its definition (from the Greek leitourgia) – the work of the people or work on behalf of the people – soon resulted in an emphasis solely on the first, rather than the more important second understanding. Some explain this as a consequence of the Council’s call for “full, active and conscious participation” (Sacrosanctum Concilium 2, 14) in the worship of the Church as the “right and duty” of the Christian people, particularly as individuals and the entire assembly gradually assumed a more active role in liturgical celebrations. It is true that, immediately after the liturgical reforms of Vatican II, the tendency was to focus on the assembly’s role in the celebration of the Liturgy while failing to recognize the more important “work of God” being accomplished in the assembly’s midst. While a better balance in understanding both aspects of the Liturgy now exists, an even greater grasp of what the Church believes and teaches about the Sacred Liturgy will bring forth much fruit for the life of the Church.

Continue reading our first Catechesis Article here.

Bishop Announces Revision of Liturgical Norms

BRIDGEPORT—The norms, or rules, governing liturgical and sacramental practices in the Diocese of Bridgeport, will be revised over the next four years, Bishop Frank J. Caggiano announced.

“When we concluded the diocesan synod, one of the major initiatives which I confirmed was the need to revise the diocesan sacramental guidelines,” Bishop Caggiano said on October 1. “The sacramental guidelines are really the depository of all the norms and guidelines that allow us to pray effectively and reverently as a Church.”

The norms were last promulgated in 1983 under Bishop Walter Curtis.

Noting that things change over, time Bishop Caggiano commented that it is important that we undertake these revisions to ensure that all sacraments and liturgical celebrations remain fruitful, collaborative, participative, and reverent.

The bishop met with the priests of the diocese on September 13 and discussed the norms, which were distributed as a provisional document. Final comments from priests are due October 10.

“As the guidelines involve hundreds of pages and every aspect of our prayer as a community, I decided to break the revisions over several years and to invite others into this process” Bishop Caggiano said. “For the last year, two dozen members of the Diocesan Liturgical Commission have been meeting to work on this first set of revisions, which cover those who serve in the important ministries of reader (lector), musician, altar server, and Extraordinary Minister of Holy Communion.

“Lay participation in the liturgy is an essential component,” the bishop added. “These norms are meant to enhance, and, in some cases, regularize how these ministries are undertaken.”

“There must be a delicate balance between a liturgy that reflects the particular needs of a community, especially our culturally diverse communities, and in keeping the liturgy consistent and authentically Catholic. The Commission has sought to accomplish this as the norms were revised,” the bishop said, acknowledging that “the norms will allow for diversity where diversity is allowed by Church law.”

“There will be changes,” the bishop said, “so it will be important to take our time and discuss the modifications that are coming. Once the norms are promulgated by sacred decree, we will live with the norms for one year and then review them to see if any further changes are necessary. This process will be repeated again and again until all norms are revised.”

Citing the angst that was caused by the sudden changes made to the celebration of liturgy in the United States in the years following Vatican II, the bishop has instead proposed a six-week catechetical journey in which all are invited and encouraged to participate.

Beginning October 15, 2018, The Leadership Institute of the diocese will issue several catechetical lessons for parishes to distribute. The first is a video in which Bishop Caggiano outlines his hope for the faithful and an overview of the revision process. Then, in the following weeks, articles will be circulated online and at parish Masses highlighting the importance of liturgy, the role of the laity, and each of the ministries discussed in the norms. These materials will be available in English and Spanish.

In addition to the written materials, Patrick Donovan, director of The Leadership Institute, announced plans for eight face-to-face meetings in October and November.

“The first four meetings are for those who serve as deacons, religious educators, coordinators of worship, choir directors, and others who share in the leadership in our parishes,” Donovan said. “There are four opportunities for parish leaders to come together in October to view the norms, make suggestions, ask questions, and discuss the revisions with those who share in the ministries governed by the norms.”

In November, there will be an additional four meetings, Donovan said. Those meetings, he said, are for anyone who serves as a reader, musician, or Extraordinary Minister of Holy Communion. Donovan added, “Any changes to the ministry of altar serving will be managed at the local level.”

The November meetings will include a chance to listen to proposed changes, learn about the formation process, and discover how those who are already serving will be grandfathered into ministry, using a truncated formation process.

Those who wish to view the resources or to sign up to attend any of the meetings in the coming weeks are invited to visit the Institute’s website, www.formationreimagined.org.

“This will be a guided process,” Bishop Caggiano said, “so that when the norms are promulgated on the first Sunday of Advent, all will understand what the norms are proposing and the principles behind them.”

“The Lord asks us to participated in his death and resurrection through grace—especially when we celebrate the Eucharist—and I am grateful to all who will accept this invitation to renewal,” the bishop said. “Through this catechesis and these revisions, may we become leaven for renewal in the rest of the world.”

For more information, contact Patrick Donovan, director of The Leadership Institute at 203.416.1657.

To learn more about the Revised Liturgical Norms or to sign up for one of the upcoming informational sessions, please visit https://formationreimagined.org/liturgical-norms/.

IHS Golf Outing on September 19

Danbury, CT | Do you have what it takes to hit a hole in one and win a new car or $10,000? Try your skill, or your luck, a the 2018 IHS Golf Outing on Wednesday, September 19 at Richter Park in Danbury. As part of the event, golfers who shoot a hole-in-one on hole 3 can win a brand new 2019 Chevrolet Equinox, sponsored by Ingersoll Auto of Danbury; a hole-in-one on hole 13 wins you $10,000, sponsored by CironeFriedberg, LLP, the Bethel-based CPA firm.

All proceeds from the golf outing benefit IHS students and school programs. To reserve your spot and/or sponsor the IHS Golf Outing on September 19, go to www.immaculatehs.org/golf.

Foursomes as well as individual golfers can sign up for the outing, which includes 18 holes of golf, cart fee, lunch, awards reception, dinner and silent auction. The raffle ticket package includes fifteen raffle tickets, six 50/50 tickets and two mulligans. Space is very limited, early golfers get the green! Contact Debbie Basile, IHS Director of Advancement, at 203-744-1510 ext.159 or at dbasile@immaculatehs.org, or Jeannie Demko, Event Coordinator, at jdemko@myimmaculatehs.org for more information. Sponsorships are available, including Tee Sponsorships.

Immaculate High School is a private, non-profit Catholic college-preparatory institution serving students from 28 communities in Connecticut and New York. Founded in 1962, Immaculate High School also allows students to focus on their spiritual development, personal moral commitments and service to others. Located in Danbury, CT, Immaculate High School is part of the Diocese of Bridgeport’s parochial school system.

St. Philip’s Annual Family Fall Festival

After two successful years, the St. Philip Family Fall Festival returns with more local vendors for fantastic shopping, children’s programs for lots of family fun and a hot grill for delicious food. The 2017 Festival attendees heard great music, shopped with many crafters and ate delicious food. Many also won awesome items from the Chinese Raffle like Yankees, Mets and Giants memorabilia, bowling and movie passes, restaurant gift cards, beautiful home goods from Lillian August, car washes, along with museum, zoo and water park passes. The Family Fall Festival brings together activities for all ages!

Join us on Saturday, September 22 from 9A – 4P at St. Philip Church 1 Father Conlon Place, Norwalk

  • Touch A Truck chance to see different kinds of working trucks up close
  • Face Painting, Touch-A-Tank, and Games for children
  • Local Artisans with arts, crafts, homemade items, jewelry, clothing, baked goods and more
  • Coachman Club Classic Cars showcasing special cars from yesteryear
  • Performances by community groups and DJs
  • Pumpkin Patch with pumpkins and mums for sale
  • Chinese Raffle including many unique and wonderful items for lots of chances to win

We look forward to a fun day with our neighbors enjoying games, good food, fun activities, shopping and music!

Reimagine RCIA Workshop

August 17-18, 2018 at St. Francis of Assisi Parish in Weston (Friday evening 7:00 PM to 9:30 PM; Saturday 8:30 AM to 4:00 PM)

This workshop provides RCIA teams with a good grounding on why the rites are the central place of formation and conversion for catechumens and candidates. Although the RCIA is a liturgical process, many RCIA team members are more catechetically-trained and focused. The aim of this workshop is not to make RCIA team members into liturgists but to give them the confidence they need to understand the liturgies of the RCIA better and how to work more effectively with presiders, liturgists, and music directors to assist them in preparing powerful rites. The workshop uses mystagogical catechesis to give RCIA teams basic skills in teaching from the liturgy. For both liturgists and catechists, we review fundamental liturgical preparation and evaluation skills, navigating a ritual text and understanding how to make use of the options and notes provided, and how to use the four liturgical arts well and to implement twelve liturgical principles. We do this all by celebrating two major rites of the RCIA and giving the participants an opportunity to practice their skills in the preparation of one of the minor rites.

Anyone who leads the RCIA process in a parish is welcome and encouraged to attend. Parishes may send a team of up to six people for one low fee. ($200 per parish team, $300 per parish team outside the Diocese of Bridgeport)

The deadline to register is August 10, 2018, but space is limited!

You can register and pay online at this event’s website at https://www.formationreimagined.org/reimagine-rcia/