Monthly Newspaper • DIOCESE OF BRIDGEPORT

Reconciliation Monday draws faithful to confession

BRIDGEPORT—Thousands across the diocese turned out yesterday for Reconciliation Monday.

Bishop Caggiano called for participation in Reconciliation Monday for the second year in a row to encourage people to experience the healing and blessing of Confession and “so that the lay faithful may experience God’s mercy as Holy Week begins.”

The invitation to participate Reconciliation Monday was created in the joyful spirit of Pope Francis who said, “Now is the time to be reconciled with God. Staying on the path of evil is only a source of sadness.”

Priests from 25 churches throughout the Diocese of Bridgeport heard Confessions yesterday from 3 pm to 9 pm.

“Last year’s Reconciliation Monday was a huge success throughout the diocese,” said Msgr. Thomas W. Powers, vicar general. “Bishop Caggiano called for participation in Reconciliation Monday to encourage people to experience the healing and blessing of Confession and ‘to be reconciled to the Lord in advance of Easter.’”

“While this is a new spiritual practice in our Diocese, the observance of Reconciliation Monday has become a tradition in the Dioceses adjacent to us for many years. It has grown in popularity in part because every Catholic knows that Sacrament of Reconciliation is available in every Catholic Church,” said the bishop, who thanked the priests and all those who participated.

Many people took to diocesan social media to encourage each other to attend confession, sharing their experiences from last year’s Reconciliation Monday.

“This is a beautiful event,” said Edward Wittkofski, “and I hope that many will take advantage of this diocesan-wide event. I have gone before and was so happy to be in such a wonderful group of Christians!”

Other social media users reported long lines of people eager to participate in the Sacrament of Reconciliation.

“Many people have misconceptions about what Confession really is. It is not solely a spiritual exercise during which you tell the priest your sins. Rather, it is a profound encounter with the Lord Jesus, who through the words and actions of the priest, meets us in our sinfulness and forgives, liberates and empowers us with the Holy Spirit so that we can go forth and sin no more,” said the bishop.